Big Stitch Binding

If you’re like me, you’ve probably seen people doing a newer binding technique that is referred to as “big stitch binding”. It is basically the brother to big stitch quilting, of which I am a huge fan. Up until last week I hadn’t tried big stitch binding and I am kicking myself for not trying it sooner. It was so easy and added SUCH a fun accent to the client quilt I was binding.

There are a few basic tutorials out there, but if you are comfortable with binding, you can likely figure it out even with out a tutorial. However, if you are interested in a tutorial, Kitchen Table Quilting has a fabulous one with photos.

The supplies required are exactly the same as those I’ve linked on my hand quilting post HERE.

I will definitely be doing big stitch binding on my next quilt where it seems like it will fit in stylistically. I found it to be much quicker and easier than normal binding!

Selvage Quilt Block Tutorial

I have been working on a Cotton + Steel selvage quilt for awhile now. It’s been slow going as I’ve needed to cut off more selvages and as friends have sent me some of theirs. I love having a relatively mindless project like this going in the background of life to pull out when I’d like to sew, but I don’t know what. It seems every time I post about it on instagram, somebody asks how I make my blocks. I know there are many, many ways to do this and many, many tutorials that exist. Here is how I do this:

First, I cut muslin to 8 1/2″ square. I have found this to be a good length for a variety of selvages, including fat eighths. I didn’t want to limit myself to having to have the diagonal length required that only fat quarters would suffice. It does mean making more blocks, but I don’t mind that one bit.

Start with a selvage that is face up and more or less centered. I never measure. I just eyeball it.

Next, line up another selvage that is long enough on the edge.

Sew along the edge using a 1/4″ seam, and then press toward the new piece (strawberries for me)

Continue this process until you reach the corner.

Once you reach the corner, repeat this process going in the opposite direction.

If you’re thinking that this looks really janky, you are right. Head to your cutting mat and flip the block over. I trim mine down to 8-1/4″ at this point.

Now you’re done! It really is a simple process. I can’t wait until Ruby Star bundles are more readily available to start sprinkling those in as well!

Hand Quilting

Every time I post about my hand quilting on instagram, I get a lot of questions. I thought it would be easier to make a permanent place for those answers to be stored here on my blog. Nothing in this post is sponsored. It is just my opinions on things I want to share to hopefully make someone’s life a bit easier in the hand quilting sense.

Last year, my husband’s aunt asked if I would like her Grace Company EZ2 hand quilting frames. I immediately jumped at the offer. Thankfully we have an unfinished basement and an easy way to store the frames when they are not in use. Because the set up does take a few minutes, I usually wait until I have 2-3 quilts that I would like to hand quilt before we get the frames out again. Every 6 months, the church that I belong to (The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints) has a general conference for the entire worldwide membership. It spans 2 days and many hours of listening to inspiring messages from our leaders. I find it extremely helpful to have a handwork project to do during those hours of listening to help me focus and stay awake. 🙂 This Saturday and Sunday happen to be general conference and I am so excited to get my hand quilting going while listening.

I find the hand quilting frames extremely helpful to my overall process. I have tried hoops, pin basting, spray and pin basting, basically every method I could try for hand quilting. I have even done it with a very different hand quilting frame set up that my mom has. This is by far the best set up. It takes about an hour for me to get my quilt loaded and ready to go. There are several helpful youtube videos that Grace Company has produced that I reference every time, just to make sure I am doing it correctly.

As far as supplies go, I do find that batting type matters quite a bit. If it’s a cheap batting, there is lots of bearding that happens as you pull the thread through. It just requires some trial and error before you can decide on a batting that works best.

I use #8 Perle Cotton as my thread. I LOVE the chunky look of this thread. I feel like hand quilting takes so much time and effort that I really like to see the stitches. This is probably an abomination to a lot of quilters, but I love the added character it gives. JoAnn’s does stock some Perle Cotton, but they do not have a huge range of colors. If you are looking for something specific, I recommend Herrschner’s online. They have sooooo many colors. I do find that their shipping is slow and expensive. If you sign up for their emails, you can wait until there is a shipping deal if you are not in a hurry. I also buy 2 skiens at a time of every color I choose. For most quilts I use 1-1.5 skiens and you just never know when you’ll need more than 1. It is such a pain to get most of the way done to have to wait on more Perle Cotton to arrive.

I never mark my lines. This is usually an adventure, but I just am not particular enough to care that things are perfect. If this is something that matters to you, I suggest you mark your lines before you load your quilt (or pin baste it or whatever your preferred method is if you don’t have hand quilting frames).

I use embroidery needles instead of a smaller needle. The heads are large enough to fit the Perle cotton easily without much fuss. I also could not do this without my Clover Leather Thimble. I use this for quilting and binding and it is LIFE CHANGING. If you do a lot of handwork and you don’t have one of these, I promise it is worth the expense. I do a lot of hand work and I find that I usually need to replace it once a year because it stretches quite a bit with use. I order a small and after I use it two or three times, it is the perfect size.

If hand quilting is something you are interested in trying, there are tons of tutorials and resources available from other bloggers. The best advice I can give is to go for it. Start with a mini or a pillow cover and go from there. If you enjoy hand work at all, hand quilting is something that is so fun to add to your repertoire!