Hand Quilting

Every time I post about my hand quilting on instagram, I get a lot of questions. I thought it would be easier to make a permanent place for those answers to be stored here on my blog. Nothing in this post is sponsored. It is just my opinions on things I want to share to hopefully make someone’s life a bit easier in the hand quilting sense.

Last year, my husband’s aunt asked if I would like her Grace Company EZ2 hand quilting frames. I immediately jumped at the offer. Thankfully we have an unfinished basement and an easy way to store the frames when they are not in use. Because the set up does take a few minutes, I usually wait until I have 2-3 quilts that I would like to hand quilt before we get the frames out again. Every 6 months, the church that I belong to (The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints) has a general conference for the entire worldwide membership. It spans 2 days and many hours of listening to inspiring messages from our leaders. I find it extremely helpful to have a handwork project to do during those hours of listening to help me focus and stay awake. 🙂 This Saturday and Sunday happen to be general conference and I am so excited to get my hand quilting going while listening.

I find the hand quilting frames extremely helpful to my overall process. I have tried hoops, pin basting, spray and pin basting, basically every method I could try for hand quilting. I have even done it with a very different hand quilting frame set up that my mom has. This is by far the best set up. It takes about an hour for me to get my quilt loaded and ready to go. There are several helpful youtube videos that Grace Company has produced that I reference every time, just to make sure I am doing it correctly.

As far as supplies go, I do find that batting type matters quite a bit. If it’s a cheap batting, there is lots of bearding that happens as you pull the thread through. It just requires some trial and error before you can decide on a batting that works best.

I use #8 Perle Cotton as my thread. I LOVE the chunky look of this thread. I feel like hand quilting takes so much time and effort that I really like to see the stitches. This is probably an abomination to a lot of quilters, but I love the added character it gives. JoAnn’s does stock some Perle Cotton, but they do not have a huge range of colors. If you are looking for something specific, I recommend Herrschner’s online. They have sooooo many colors. I do find that their shipping is slow and expensive. If you sign up for their emails, you can wait until there is a shipping deal if you are not in a hurry. I also buy 2 skiens at a time of every color I choose. For most quilts I use 1-1.5 skiens and you just never know when you’ll need more than 1. It is such a pain to get most of the way done to have to wait on more Perle Cotton to arrive.

I never mark my lines. This is usually an adventure, but I just am not particular enough to care that things are perfect. If this is something that matters to you, I suggest you mark your lines before you load your quilt (or pin baste it or whatever your preferred method is if you don’t have hand quilting frames).

I use embroidery needles instead of a smaller needle. The heads are large enough to fit the Perle cotton easily without much fuss. I also could not do this without my Clover Leather Thimble. I use this for quilting and binding and it is LIFE CHANGING. If you do a lot of handwork and you don’t have one of these, I promise it is worth the expense. I do a lot of hand work and I find that I usually need to replace it once a year because it stretches quite a bit with use. I order a small and after I use it two or three times, it is the perfect size.

If hand quilting is something you are interested in trying, there are tons of tutorials and resources available from other bloggers. The best advice I can give is to go for it. Start with a mini or a pillow cover and go from there. If you enjoy hand work at all, hand quilting is something that is so fun to add to your repertoire!

Espadrille Shoe Kits

Each year I set a goal for myself to try something fabric related that is new to me. Sometimes the things I try I end up hating. Sometimes they are a total flop. Other times, I do something that turns out to be so fun and liberating and enjoyable that I want to keep making it over and over again. This is the case with these fun espadrille shoes. I bought a kit from Melissa at A Happy Stitch. I cannot believe the attention to detail she puts in to each kit. It was really like opening up a present to myself. The instructions are easy to follow and everything is included to make these adorable shoes. I started off with a wedge kit and have since purchased a kit to make myself some flats for the summer. I get compliments every time I wear my wedges to church and it never gets old to be able to say, “Thank you. I made them!” If you’re looking for something to ignite the creative spark, I cannot recommend these shoes enough.

When to Take Your Juki in For Service

 

When I purchased my Juki TL-2000 Qi, I was told by soooo many people that I would never, ever have the need to service it. This was a huge selling point for me. Here’s the back story behind that. I took my Husqvarna Viking in to be serviced at a “vacuum & sewing machine” repair shop. WHYYYYY did nobody stop me?? In fact, when I asked on Instagram where people in my area take their machines to be serviced, the exact place I went was recommended. My machine came back dripping in oil and functioning very differently, and not in a good way. When I started looking into a new machine a few months later, I knew I wanted something that would require less maintenance and the magical “no service required ever” promise sounded so enticing.

Fast forward to now, about a year and a half after having purchased my Juki. I started having occasional hiccups and wondered if I needed to find someone to look at it. I kept pushing that thought aside because I should “never” have to service my machine. I have literally sewn hundreds of hours on this bad boy and of course it will need to be serviced when it’s being used that heavily. I quilt my own quilts, I piece lots of tops, I sew zippers, I do EVERYTHING I can on this machine. Naturally it needs some love and care. In case you fall in the same boat that I was in (the I was told I’d never have to service my Juki boat), I thought I’d give a few tips for not only what signs your machine might give you that it’s time for some love as well as how to find a good place to take it.

SIGNS YOUR JUKI NEEDS CARE:

  • repeating tension issues- I started getting random rats nests that were not reproducible nor easily fixed. It seemed like I just had to sew and sew and sew and eventually it would work itself out. For awhile……
  • it just doesn’t sound as happy as it once did – this is hard to explain, but you know exactly what I’m saying if you’re having similar concerns
  • your needle is hitting your bobbin case
  • you can’t switch back and forth between free motion quilting and straight line sewing without tension issues
  • you are diligent at oiling and cleaning, yet things still don’t feel right
  • skipped stitches – I’m not just talking about needing to change a needle, because this also happens when a needle needs to be changed.

When I got the report back from getting my Juki serviced, the technician had to not only fix the timing, but also rebuild the tension. These are not tiny issues and make sense why I was having so many issues.

WHERE TO TAKE YOUR JUKI:

  • DO NOT, I repeat DO NOT, take your beloved machine to just any vacuum and sewing repair shop.
  • Ideally, find a Juki dealer near you and have them service it. If they sell it, they should be able to fix it.
  • If you do not have a Juki dealer close to you, find another shop that sells LEGIT brands of sewing machines (I’m not talking about ones you can buy at Walmart). Be sure to call and talk to them first to see if they can service a Juki. Most shops will, but it’s always best to double check.

A sewing machine is a huge investment, as we all know, and every once in awhile needs some attention. If you are feeling like your machine just isn’t up to snuff any more, invest in its future and have it serviced!!