Spread a little Joy with Cricut Joy Insert Cards

This is a sponsored post written by me on behalf of Cricut. All opinions are 100% mine.

This is such a weird, weird time in our lives right now. Many of us are feeling isolated, at home with family, some are alone. Life feels a bit overwhelming if we let it. It’s hard to get out of my own way and help others at times. I am so excited to share a fun project I made on my Cricut Joy with you today.

Cricut Joy is the newest (and smallest!) addition to the Cricut machine family. It is amazing what such a small machine can do! My family and I have had a fun time playing with it and doing different things over the past month. Today I’m going to share with you how to make a complex looking card which is actually quite simple, thanks to the Cricut Joy. Here’s what you’ll need:

Cricut Joy

Cricut Joy Card Mat

Cricut Joy Insert Cards, Princess Sampler

Cricut Joy Metallic Markers

Cricut Joy Starter Tool Set (if you have tools from a different Cricut machine, those will work just great)

Cricut Joy Tote (this is obviously optional, but it is SO wonderful for storing your Cricut Joy!)


To begin, you’ll need to set up your Cricut Joy and link it to your phone or iPad or tablet or computer via Bluetooth. This is extremely easy and Cricut has done a great job of including instructions on how to do that with the actual Cricut Joy packaging. You will also want to make sure you have downloaded Cricut Design Space, which is where you will find Cricut Joy insert card ideas and files for cutting.

Once in Cricut Design Space, you will want to filter the results in alllllll of Cricut Design Space to just those for “Cricut Joy Insert Cards” as shown in this screenshot.

I chose to make 3 different cards which I sent to 3 different people on the frontlines of this COVID-19 fight. For my NP neighbor, I made the “Hearts Rising” card. For my paramedic/firefighter neighbor, I made the “Out of this World”card. For my dear police officer friend, I made the “You Are My Hero” card. All 3 were incredibly easy to cut out and make. If you haven’t made any cards on the Cricut Joy yet, I recommend reading this awesome how-to created by the folks at Cricut to show you the process.

Remove the film on the Cricut Joy Card Mat, then place insert the plastic in between the two layers of your card. Push down on the front of the card so it adheres to the sticky part of the plastic. 🙂

For this demo, I made the “You Are My Hero” card. Choose that file in Cricut Design Space, and click “Make It” in the lower right hand corner. You will then be prompted to make the card, which does require you to start off with a Cricut Joy maker in the housing. I used a black marker, but a metallic marker would make this card stand out even more!

Once the machine is done drawing the outlines of all of the letters, it will prompt you to change out the marker and insert the blade. From there, the Cricut Joy will take over and cut this awesome card out for you. Use your tools to carefully weed all of the excess cardstock and then remove the card from the cutting mat.

Now comes the fun part! Insert the holographic piece behind the cutout, write your message inside, and voila! We are hooked on making card with the Cricut Joy. My boys picked out family members and sent them cards. You could send card to a nursing home nearby and thank the staff for their work. You could send a card to anyone. We all need a little Joy in our lives right now and sending a card can be that pick-me-up someone needs!

Making a Quilted Pillow with Cricut Explore Air 2

I am excited to share a fun experiment gone right with you today. I was invited to participate in The Fat Quarter Shop’s Pillow Fight (I outlined what that means and all about the amazing book HERE) and thought this would be a fun time to experiment with my Cricut Explore Air 2.

Because I wanted to cut out circles from fabric, but I wanted extreme control over where the fabric was cut, I decided that using freezer paper would be my best option to get the results I was desiring. Did you know you can cut out freezer paper using your Cricut Explore Air 2? I sure did not.

To begin, make sure you have freezer paper. I found the cheapest place to get this is at the grocery store. Shocker there. 🙂

Cut the freezer paper down to the size of your Cricut light grip mat. I used a 12″ x 24″ mat, so I cut my freezer paper down to 12″ x 24″ using my rotary cutter that has been deemed my “paper” rotary cutter. Adhere it to the mat with the shiny side DOWN. Work in Cricut Design Space to prep whatever shape you are wanting to cut out (for me it was circles).

When you go to cut out your freezer paper shapes, turn the Smart Set Dial to “custom”. You will then need to search the custom materials until you find parchment paper. That will cut your freezer paper perfectly!

If you are using freezer paper to center on a fussy cut section of fabric, simply heat your iron up, and press it shiny side down onto the RIGHT side of the fabric. Good news. If you mess up a bit, you can lift it off and readhere it using your iron. Freezer paper is the best!

But wait, there’s more!!! You can also use your Cricut Explore Air 2 on the exact same settings to cut Heat ‘n’ Bond Lite!!! I cut out the circles I needed for my fabric fussy cuts using the same process outlined above (just make sure the paper side goes onto the sticky side of the Cricut mat)

I loved this experiment and I am so glad it worked out in my favor! If you are interested in making a pillow of your own, be sure to grab Edyta Sitar’s book Pillow Talk from The Fat Quarter Shop HERE!

Quilt Block Coasters with Infusible Ink

Ever since I had my husband help me make some quilt block SVG files, I have wanted to make myself some new coasters using those files. I have heard a lot about Cricut Infusible Ink and this seemed like the perfect project to try out!

Here’s what you’ll need:

SVG quilt block file bundle 1 or bundle 2 from my Etsy shop

Cricut Infusible Ink Coasters (I prefer the ceramic ones)

Cricut Infusible Ink Transfer Sheets (I used party pink)

Cricut Easy Press 2 or other heat transfer source that reaches 400degrees F

I tried out making coasters with the square coasters and the round coasters. Here’s what I learned:

To use the square coasters, make sure your image is no larger than 3.5″ square. They don’t require as much time to process the infusible ink, but they also don’t feel as nice, in my opinion. For a Cricut tutorial, click HERE.

To use the round coasters, make sure your image is no larger than 3″. They require quite a bit more time of active heat to process the infusible ink, but in the end the result feels much nicer. For a Cricut tutorial, click HERE.

In the end, this was really such a fun project. I know I’ll be making them again as a quick creative reset.

Have you used infusible ink yet? What did you think of it??